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What does it mean to be a leader? The Oxford Dictionary defines a leader as “a person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country.” But the dictionary does not define “women leaders” separately. NO, being a woman leader is not defined as “a woman who leads or commands a group, organization, or country.” What makes women leaders different?

The other day I tweeted, “If women treated men the way men treat women, I have an inkling that the society would be treating women differently.”

When society looks at women and tells them: “you can’t do that,” “you’re not smart enough,” and “you are supposed to be a good daughter/sister/wife/mother” it becomes hard to challenge the norms of society. But, without a doubt, women have risen above these belittling comments. And, all these women who have risen are leaders – women leaders!

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/what-is-a-woman-leader-by-sareana

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"We live in an age where we feel guilt whenever we have to cut someone off but the reality is that some relationships do need to die, some people do need to be unfollowed and defriended. We aren’t meant to be this tethered to the people in our past. The Internet mandates that we don’t burn bridges and keep everyone around like relics but those expectations are unrealistic and unhealthy. Simply put, we don’t need to know what everyone else is up to. We’re allowed to be choosy about who we surround ourselves with online and in real life, even if it might hurt people’s feelings."

- Ryan O’Connell, You Don’t Have To Be Friends With Everybody (via spinals)

(via mortem3rs)

Source: larmoyante
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There are two women who have continuously served to inspire me in the STEM fields.

The first is Limor Fried, who is a super rad electrical engineer with colorful hair and several piercings. Israeli and a super-genius who recently graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she is the perfect inspiration for Israeli, purple haired me.

In 2005, Limor started Adafruit, an open source electronic kit company. Inspired by Lady Ada Lovelace, often called history’s first computer programmer, Adafruit designs and sells electronics kits. While I had heard of Limor Fried, I had never really noticed her until she appeared on the Cover of WIRED Magazine. For a while I actually had her cover taped up to my mirror so that it would be the first thing I saw in the morning. She had at least one facial piercing and current pictures of her indicate her affinity for pink hair. She was the first time I saw that not only could women be scientists, but could also decide not to conform to traditional aesthetics. I was immediately inspired, especially by her do-it-yourself attitude and her position that science is meant for kids. Even now as a young woman, I am told that I’m too young to do certain things; she showed a world where science was for everyone. Inside and out, she is truly an inspiration.

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/shanni-stem-inspirations/

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1. Waking up in the morning will sometimes be the hardest thing you do all day. Wake up anyways

2. Just because someone is sad it does not mean it is your fault, people are people, we all have different emotions, comfort them, don’t blame yourself

3. It is okay to want to be held, to want to have a shoulder to cry on, no one should ever be alone

4. It’s your life, if you want to pack up and move to another country, do it, no one can stop you.

5. Come home when you’ve found yourself in the faraway places

6. Home is not always a house, or a place. Home is simply where you feel safe

7. Everyone has their own story to tell, do not judge a book by its cover

8. No one can save you, only you can save you. You will drag everyone you love down with you if you keep expecting a miracle, start with a smile, maybe a laugh, you can do it, you can save yourself

9. Don’t wake up at 5am just to see the cold hazy blue before sunrise, it will confuse you, it will make you think you’re not real. go back to sleep, wake up when the sun is on your face, smile, stretch, try

10. Never scream at yourself in the mirror, it won’t help, stare longer, look a little closer, find something on your skin you like, whether it’s a scar a vein or a freckle, the smallest things mean the most

11. Don’t rival yourself against the one you love, you will no longer be companions but enemies, it will not work, you will be heartbroken

12. If someone loves you they won’t care about your morning breath, they’ll kiss you goodmorning anyways

13. Never spend the night in a hospital if you can avoid it, you will not sleep, you will stare at empty walls until the sun comes up

14. Take pictures of everything that looks pleasing to you, because you might never see it again

15. Don’t lose hope, in anything, ever, things will be okay in the end, I promise

16. There is someone out there who is looking to meet someone just like you

17. You will be okay

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- 17 things I’ve learned at 17// C.C (via latttte)

(via adolescendtwolf)

Source: latttte
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Aloe Blacc: Sending Powerful Messages Through Music

Wake Me Up is the EDM song of the summer; the catchy hooks, dance beats, and acoustic guitar make it a must-have on any party playlist. It even hit #1 in 103 countries. Swedish DJ Avicii produced the music, but who’s that singing the folk vocals? American soul singer Aloe Blacc provided uncredited vocals, but he’s making his mark on music through other means.

Born as Egbert Nathaniel Dawkins III to Panamanian parents, Aloe Blacc lived the SoCal all the way until graduating from the University of Southern California in 2001. Aloe Blacc released a few albums with the indie/jazz/rap group Emanon and one solo album, but didn’t gain mainstream popularity until his second solo album on Stone Throw Records in 2010, titled Good Things. Sales hit double platinum, and his economy-conscious single “I Need a Dollar” even made it as the theme song in the HBO series How To Make It In America. Soon after signing to Interscope, his music was used in commercials for Battlefield 4, Beats by Dr.Dre, and WWE.

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/aloe-blacc-by-claire

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This summer is full of grunge revivals from the 90′s. Some of the main contenders in this summer’s throwback style are flannel shirts, high waisted shorts, crop tops, bandanas, and combat boots. Despite the high temperatures, girls all over have been layering flannel shirts over anything and everything.

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/fashion-alert-grunge-revival-by-kaleigh

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 This Week in the Supreme Court The past two weeks, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS, for short) has made two very important rulings: one about buffer zones and the other about the right of companies to refuse some forms of birth control based on religious beliefs.

The first case, McCullen v. Coakley, questioned the legal status of the buffer zone for abortion clinics in Massachusetts. See, while there is freedom of speech for anti-choice protesters, there have been situations in the past when their actions have passed from speaking to physical violence. Because of this, Massachusetts enacted a law which established a buffer zone in front of abortion clinics. This means that protesters must be a certain distance from the entrance and exits, in this case being 35 feet. The law was challenged by Eleanor McCullen, a member of Operation Rescue, an organization that opposes abortion. McCullen argued that she, along with other protesters, aren’t talking women out of getting abortions. Instead, she said, they want to convince these women to have babies. By making the calm protesters stand further away from the entrances of the clinics, the Massachusetts law is impeding upon free speech. The justices of the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the law is unconstitutional, not due to its controversial nature (regarding abortion protesters), but because it restricted free speech based on location. It is interesting to me that this decision was reached unanimously, considering the violence that abortion providers and their patients have faced in the past. Just in 2012, abortion providers in North America faced 88 counts of violence, including arson, vandalism, assault & battery, death threats, and stalking. Patients often are victim to harassment and stalking. There is a difference between protesting and violence, and I hope that the reversal of this law does not lead to more acts of violence against America’s doctors and patients.

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/this-week-in-scotus-by-shanni

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You’re never too young to learn and you’re never too young to make a difference.” – Caleb Christian, one of the inventors of Five-O

Over the summer, Reshini highlighted several youth changemakers and we’re back to highlight several more teens who are making a difference using their awesome brains and skills.

Google’s Science Fair always boasts an impressive list of contestants.  This year, Cynthia Lam’s invention stands out.  Concerned about the millions of people without clean water (~780 million) and energy (~1.2 billion do not have electricity), the 17-year-old Australian invented the H2Pro, a portable unit that provides fresh water and clean energy. While learning about a process called photocatalysis (we googled it too) she came up with the idea of the H2Pro.

- See more at: http://missheardmagazine.com/these-stem-teens-are-changing-the-world